Author Topic: Hiking sticks/poles  (Read 5365 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

BlackRose67

  • Big Time Cacher
  • *****
  • Posts: 589
Hiking sticks/poles
« on: June 28, 2012, 19:46:52 »
My father in law received a Hiking Stick from Lee Valley (http://www.leevalley.com/en/garden/page.aspx?p=52925&cat=2,40725,45454,52925) for Father's Day, and now my wife thinks I should have one for caching.

Even though she doesn't cache, she thinks I need something better than my MacGyver'd dining tent canopy support pole with tape on it for a handle  ::) ;D for poking around in the brush.

I do use my stick/tent pole for poking around in the brush and when I go off trail (which I seem to be doing more of), but not for support/walking assistance since it's too short for that. 

If I end up caching in the winter, I could definitely see a benefit for having something better.
For those of you that have hiking sticks, do you find them worthwhile to have?

bluelamb03

  • Administrator
  • Big Time Cacher
  • *****
  • Posts: 1634
  • Good hunting everyone!
Re: Hiking sticks/poles
« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2012, 21:07:37 »
It keeps me from falling over on rough terrain!

Seriously, a useful accessory on long hikes and tricky terrain. It's kept me dry or on my feet more than once. I recommend one for anyone who's serious about hiking.

Blue -
Without shared stories we are strangers.
- Sheila Mendonça


graciious

  • Guest
Re: Hiking sticks/poles
« Reply #2 on: June 28, 2012, 21:13:03 »
I got a pair on sale at "Sail" simple spring loaded, collapsible, and nice formed cork handles. I believe the set was 24 dollars taxes in.  They include steel tips, with covers and snow guards for winter use.

Not sure if the lee-valley ones are priced as a pair or individually, but you could try before you buy by checking out some stores.  I haven't used mine once since I got them, but then again I haven't done any hiking.

I am really planning on snowshoeing this winter and that is when I expect they will get some good use.

BlackRose67

  • Big Time Cacher
  • *****
  • Posts: 589
Re: Hiking sticks/poles
« Reply #3 on: June 28, 2012, 21:57:23 »
The one from Lee Valley is for a single pole (with steel tip, cover, and snow guard) so kinda pricey for a pair. 

Sail has a pair of Protex ones for $39.99 reg price (not sure if they are the same model as the ones you have graciious).

My biggest trek to date has been touring the south end of the Stoney Swamp, so nothing too adventurous yet.
There are a lot of areas of the Stoney Swamp I want to visit, but will wait until I can find a caching partner for the ones that are deeper in.

graciious

  • Guest
Re: Hiking sticks/poles
« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2012, 19:44:27 »
I'll let you try my poles when you take me deeper into stoney swamp..  Lets chat about when we can get together.  I don't go out too often but am certainly interested in an adventure.

junglehair

  • Guest
Re: Hiking sticks/poles
« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2012, 13:04:22 »
I have a pair of extendible ski poles that I add rubber tips to in the summer and use as hiking poles when needed.  I usually only end up taking one though so that the other hand is free to carry the GPS.  It's great to have along for that extra bit of balance and can be a big help on hilly or difficult terrain as others have mentioned.  We don't have too many poisonous critters around here, but they can also be helpful to just poke around in places where you don't want to just blindly stick your hand in.  Don't try using them to chip away the ice at a frozen lamp skirt however.   I am now looking for a new pair of ski poles to replace mine. :(

model12

  • Administrator
  • Big Time Cacher
  • *****
  • Posts: 672
  • Rifling through your cache
    • SteveHanes.com
Re: Hiking sticks/poles
« Reply #6 on: July 04, 2012, 12:24:46 »
There was a good topic about poles on the old forum, but I haven't been able to find it.

From memory;

Poles are good for balance. Rocks, logs, creek crossings...

Defense. You're not the only one out there. Dogs, especially in dog parks are notorious for running freely and right up to you.

Searching. Poking into holes, reaching up for over-the-head hides. Chipping containers out of icebound hides.

Tripping. When racing to that FTF you desperately need for your challenge quest...

Camera Monopod. The Lee Valley one with the removable black know has a threaded rod for your camera.

Steve

“Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter, and those who matter don't mind.”
- Dr. Seuss



BlackRose67

  • Big Time Cacher
  • *****
  • Posts: 589
Re: Hiking sticks/poles
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2012, 16:50:02 »
After destroying yet another pair of old running shoes while caching this morning (that's 3 pair so far this year) I went over to Sail this afternoon to check out the hiking shoes they have on sale.

Before I made it to the shoes, I came across a table that had a pair of Chinook Trekking 2 two section hiking poles for $16.99 (reg $21.99).
They come with a web strap, carbide tip, rubber tip, hiking basket, and snow basket tips. 
Yes they are cheap, but they have to be better than the dining tent support pole I was using.

Got a pair of hiking shoes as well for $39.99.