Author Topic: Tips for hiding a geocache  (Read 4510 times)

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kirok

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Tips for hiding a geocache
« on: August 11, 2010, 19:50:24 »
This a compilation of an original thread on a different forum.  Thanks to hidnseek, model12 and bluelamb03 for their contributions so far.

  • 1.  If the cache is hidden in a urban area make sure the establishments that can see it are aware of it.  Most places will welcome the chance to watch us make fools of ourselves looking for it  :P as it brings people to them.

  • 2. Containers

    Due to recent events in Ottawa with the Bomb Squad (EDU), containers that clearly do NOT look like potential bombs are in order - clear Lock ‘n Lock’s seem to fit the bill. Avoid any container that a muggle might mistake for a bomb, one with military markings still visible on its exterior, or a container that cannot be visually identified as a geocache by any reasonable member of the public.

    To owners of existing caches, please consider voluntarily swapping out your existing container for another that better serves our collective goal of making geocaching safe, fun and worry-free for the entire population. As responsible geocachers we lead by example!

    http://support.groundspeak.com/Support/index.php?_m=knowledgebase&_a=viewarticle&kbarticleid=343&nav=0,5 is a great read for guidelines about suggested container styles, types and preparation.

  • 3.  Check your cache hide in all season to see what it is really like.
     
    If you hide your cache in the summer check the hide in winter.  Is it winter friendly?  Is it too exposed when the leaves come off the trees/bushes?

    If you hide it in winter check the hide in summer.  Did you hide it in a poison ivy patch?  Is it in the middle of a swamp/pond?  Is it higher then you though? (2007-2008 if you hid it 2ft above the snow line it could have been 7 feet above ground come summer)

  • 4. Check your posted co-ordinates carefully!

    If your GPS has an 'averaging' feature sit it down and let it average out the location for a few hundred readings. If your GPS doesn't have that feature then just sit it down for ten minutes and let it settle. Try for a day with the best reception possible. Test your co-ordinates by entering them manually and 'finding' the cache or allowing another to 'beta-test' the cache design. Transposed numbers can be a curse! Don't worry about errors of less than ten meters, that's within the combined CEP of two GPSrs looking for the same spot, but anything larger than that radius is a concern. Remember that certain locations, against cliffs or in dense canopy forest for example, can bugger up reception significantly. Remember too that an 'obvious' hide ("That's where I'd put it too!") or a good hint can compensate greatly for bad numbers!

  • 5.  A few things to speed the process of your cache being published:
         -follow the guidelines and beware of changes to them
               http://www.geocaching.com/about/guidelines.aspx/
        - Enter home coordinates or the coordinates of something close to home
               http://www.geocaching.com/my/home.aspx
         -Be aware of proximity issues and do not place caches close to each other the minimum is 162m Yes there is a lot of puzzles and multi's in the area and you may not have found them all but  traditional you should be aware of.
         -You can add waypoints of trail heads or parking and make them visible to others. The WAYPOINTS feature can be found on your listing in the NAVIGATION area.
« Last Edit: August 11, 2010, 19:52:24 by kirok »

bluelamb03

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Re: Tips for hiding a geocache
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2010, 15:53:06 »
I believe it was narcissa who said "...'stealth required' is usually a euphemism for 'there shouldn't be a cache here'...."

If your cache is going to bring other geocachers into a confrontation with people, especially 'security', then perhaps this isn't best location for it.

You want a 'Great cache, thanks for bringing me here" log, not the "I got yelled at by the woman next door...." logs!

Blue -
« Last Edit: October 19, 2010, 08:39:36 by bluelamb03 »
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PA

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Re: Tips for hiding a geocache
« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2010, 22:36:07 »
I posted my Hiding Principles on the ACGA forums (Atlantic Canada Geocaching Association).

Here they are:

*********************

We all have our own hiding techniques and principles.

I would like to share ours. These are the general rules we try to adhere to when hiding caches, and some of the techniques to save us money and also to make it interesting.

I said save money because we have created 295 caches and there is a cost for the containers, the camo, the tape, magnets, swag, log books, etc.

* If hiding on a trail, we try to keep them at least 300 meters or more apart.
* If hiding on a trail, the purpose is to show people the trail and have them bike and walk it, so we do not make it difficult. We hang behind a tree or in an obvious evergreen not far from trail.
* If we have a micro on a trail, we place it in a tree that is standing alone.
* We try and make most caches winter friendly. This means a cost for duct tape and hooks.
* We try to get tobacco containers from smokers since the containers are weatherproof and are free.
*We have asked for Film cancisters at Walmart and received lots.
*We bought a load of strong tiny magnets from Lee Valley and Princess auto and duct tape them to film canister. Not pretty but cheap.
*We bought a bunch of bison tubes at Lee Valley. We indicate that the caches are smaller than a micro and we use the word bison in the name.
*We bought 150 feet of wire from Dollarama for $1.25
*We get most of our swag from Dollarama. Mostly kid stuff, and put very little in the caches unless it is a kid friendly area.
*We have stopped putting pencils in our micros. In our opinion, cachers should travel with a writing instrument. I spend enough time preparing caches without having to whittle a pencil down to size. We indicate on cache page that pencil is needed.
*We now print 6 log information sheets on a letter size piece of paper and then cut it. This is usually good enough to serve as a log in our micros. We use the log sheets from the Texas caching group
*In our regular sized caches we use the same information sheet mentioned above and usually add a log book.
*We buy log books at Dollarama. They are 4 for $1. We usually cut them and end up with about 10 small books. This is especially handy during the winter challenge. ( I said we were cheap)
*We strive to have a reason for every cache. It could be a series to get you out hiking or into the woods. It could be a micro to bring you to a place with a great view. or a new trail or park we have discovered. It could be to show you something interesting, or it could be a little puzzle challenge.
*I have created a number of puzzle caches. I try to place them in uninteresting places, in order to keep interesting places for regular caches.
* If creating a number of puzzle caches, I try to have them approved in groups to make it easier on the cachers. I also try to have the group all in the same area, and I often put the approximate location in the name so cachers can decide if they should bother solving it.
*It is as much fun to hide as to find.
*Based on what we have seen, we would recommend that people get a number of finds before going out to hide. That way you have an idea of what others are doing, the kinds of containers, the appropriate locations, how to camo, etc.
*Not everyone can do this but we try to make our Shediac area caches bilingual in order to help the French speaking cachers and tourists.
*We keep our hints short but often try to avoid words that can be decyphered at a glance. So maybe say "stuck to metal" instead of "magnetic".
* It seems that most cachers do not trade these days so we do not put much if any swag in a cache, unless it is in a kid friendly area.
* Because most cachers seem not to trade, we see no point in placing a regular in places where a Micro will go.
*We have camo material that we bought some time ago. Ma is now sewing it into camo bags that we attach firmly to trees. We place ur tobacco containers in them.  We got this idea from caches placed by Belladan.

Sakidoo

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Re: Tips for hiding a geocache
« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2010, 23:17:52 »
Impressive.  Thanks for sharing. 

bluelamb03

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Re: Tips for hiding a geocache
« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2010, 11:45:56 »
I've talked to a number of people recently who have had problems placing a cache out in the world,  x3blessed's experience with "Pandora's Box" (GC2HJWG), http://coord.info/GC2HJWG, is an extreme case.

There are many multi-caches and puzzles in the region and you may not know their waypoints, so placing a cache and submitting the co-ordinates is a rather hit and miss proposition. If you suspect there's a multi-cache or puzzle final in the area you've selected for your cache but haven't a clue where all the waypoints are you are better off previewing the cache with a reviewer.

Build the cache page, with all the appropriate waypoints included, and submit it for review with an explicit reviewer note. Ensure you make it clear the cache is not in place yet but that you are prepared to enable the listing once the waypoints are given the green light!
If your cache fails the litmus test you can re-work the waypoints without the need to trek back out there and retrieve the container you placed. Patience is a virtue, and depending on where you've chosen to place a cache you may need a lot of it....

Communicate effectively with the reviewer, and remember your's is not the only cache listing they're reading today, and you can save everyone a lot of time and bother!

Blue -
Without shared stories we are strangers.
- Sheila Mendonça


Lone R

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Re: Tips for hiding a geocache
« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2011, 11:27:34 »
I posted my Hiding Principles on the ACGA forums (Atlantic Canada Geocaching Association).

Here they are:

*********************
*I have created a number of puzzle caches. I try to place them in uninteresting places, in order to keep interesting places for regular caches.

I solve puzzle caches from time to time. I like to be rewarded for the extra effort with a nice cache excursion that ends in a pleasant location with a swag size cache. There have been discussions on the GC forum about this and many puzzle COs feel the same way, that the reward in solving a gc puzzle is in solving the puzzle. But many gc puzzle solvers want a fuller experience. Personally, if I only want to solve puzzles, there are a lot of puzzle websites and then there are those Dell Word Puzzle books you can be at the drug store.

bluelamb03

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Re: Tips for hiding a geocache
« Reply #6 on: October 26, 2011, 12:19:46 »
I solve puzzle caches from time to time. I like to be rewarded for the extra effort with a nice cache excursion that ends in a pleasant location with a swag size cache. There have been discussions on the GC forum about this and many puzzle COs feel the same way, that the reward in solving a gc puzzle is in solving the puzzle. But many gc puzzle solvers want a fuller experience. Personally, if I only want to solve puzzles, there are a lot of puzzle websites and then there are those Dell Word Puzzle books you can be at the drug store.

I wholeheartedly agree with you!

For many cachers it's all about the puzzle and the hide itself is almost an afterthought, often a disappointing micro in an unprepossessing spot. To me it doesn't matter what type of cache it is, it should be a nice hide in a nice location. Who wants to go digging through garbage for a cache? And if it's just another micro in a pine tree, it's just another micro in a pine tree - what's so special about solving the puzzle first?

Blue -
Without shared stories we are strangers.
- Sheila Mendonça


Lone R

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Re: Tips for hiding a geocache
« Reply #7 on: October 26, 2011, 14:04:09 »
I posted my Hiding Principles on the ACGA forums (Atlantic Canada Geocaching Association).

Here they are:

*********************
Because most cachers seem not to trade, we see no point in placing a regular in places where a Micro will go.

Re-read the list and found the principle above that I also have qualms with.

Please folks hide a swag size cache whenever possible. There are many cachers who:
  • like to paw through the contents, even if they rarely trade
  • like trackables and want room in the cache to take and leave them
  • make handcrafted signature items and like to leave them in caches (I get some great feedback in my blog when folks find mine and I enjoy finding handcrafted stuff)
  • are excited to find toys in the box - young (and young-at-heart) geocachers
 
Swag size caches appeal to everyone. Micros appeal to a subset of geocachers.

PA

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Re: Tips for hiding a geocache
« Reply #8 on: October 26, 2011, 19:54:13 »
I posted my Hiding Principles on the ACGA forums (Atlantic Canada Geocaching Association).

Here they are:

*********************
Because most cachers seem not to trade, we see no point in placing a regular in places where a Micro will go.

Re-read the list and found the principle above that I also have qualms with.

Please folks hide a swag size cache whenever possible. There are many cachers who:
  • like to paw through the contents, even if they rarely trade
  • like trackables and want room in the cache to take and leave them
  • make handcrafted signature items and like to leave them in caches (I get some great feedback in my blog when folks find mine and I enjoy finding handcrafted stuff)
  • are excited to find toys in the box - young (and young-at-heart) geocachers
 
Swag size caches appeal to everyone. Micros appeal to a subset of geocachers.

We have hidden many traditional caches and we use regular sized caches in many situations.  If in a family friendly area, we will put some swag for children in them. In general there is very little trading going on, and I really dont want to use up my caching and camo supplies on regulars when the cachers treat regulars and micros in the same way. I do agree with you that it is nice to have regular sized caches for the trackables.  We spend a lot of time moving peoples trackables and are always on the lookout for newer regular sized caches, to place them in.


We have many traditionals out there,  many in series. One series of 29 caches in the deep woods is all regular sized because it is a less travelled route and I could put them in the woods away from the trail without worrying about muggles.

Another series of 16 caches is on a rail to trails which has narrow woods on each side and which  may have a few muggles around. This series has a mixture of micros and regulars depending on the location.

I feel that a series on a trail is created to get you out to discover the trail, and get a bit of exercise.  I dont think the size  matters

We have a few challenge caches out there and they are regular sized, (many are ammo cans) except for our micro challenge cache

**************************************

And there was also a couple of comments about puzzles

I have created a number of puzzle caches. I try to place them in uninteresting places, in order to keep interesting places for regular caches.



For many cachers it's all about the puzzle and the hide itself is almost an afterthought, often a disappointing micro in an unprepossessing spot. To me it doesn't matter what type of cache it is, it should be a nice hide in a nice location. Who wants to go digging through garbage for a cache? And if it's just another micro in a pine tree, it's just another micro in a pine tree - what's so special about solving the puzzle first?

Blue -

Around the Moncton area some of the cachers are little upset at Jim52's great puzzle series, because the 52 caches are all on an urban trail, and they feel that the trail should have been used for traditionals so that cachers who dont do puzzles could discover the trail.  That is why I usually put out our Micro Logics in Industrial parks, or on seldom used country roads.

When I put out puzzles, i usually put out a group of up to 10-12 at the same time, and have them all in the same general area.  So when they solve them, they can pick them all up at the same time.  This also  allows the puzzle solvers to go out with caching friends for a few hours.  A few cachers here and on PEI also hide caches in this way.

GopherGreg

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Re: Tips for hiding a geocache
« Reply #9 on: August 08, 2012, 15:30:13 »
I'll need to think of these when I hide an other geocache! A few of mine got muggled because they were, well, pretty much doing everything wrong, (Tha was on your list!)!

Thanks, I'll think of these points when hiding my next cache,

Best,
~GopherGreg