Author Topic: Geocache Containers - Protect your Investment  (Read 10542 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

bluelamb03

  • Administrator
  • Big Time Cacher
  • *****
  • Posts: 1637
  • Good hunting everyone!
Geocache Containers - Protect your Investment
« on: October 21, 2011, 18:23:10 »
OK, so you're not going to buy a second hand shipping container, what should you use for your cache?

I found a geocache called TREEHOLE http://coord.info/GCWHDJ in 2006 that was in a paperboard box lying on the ground under a large leaf. Needless to say it didn't last very long.

Enthusiastic newcomers are prone to using any containers they find at hand, raiding the recycling bin for what they need. Margarine tubs, yogurt containers, PB jars - you've probably seen them all in use. Even the venerable 'tupperware' which has given it's name to this hobby is actually a very poor container. They're made of polyethylene and over time, due to different rates of expansion of the different materials which are often used for the lid and the base, the lids will lose their ability to seal properly.

Some commonsense guidelines for choosing cache containers can be found in section 6.2 of the Geocaching Knowledge Books,  http://support.groundspeak.com/index.php?pg=kb.page&id=75, another valuable source of information for geocachers.

Blue -
« Last Edit: May 22, 2013, 12:48:14 by bluelamb03 »
Without shared stories we are strangers.
- Sheila Mendonça


PA

  • Guest
Re: Geocache Containers - Protect your Investment
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2011, 23:32:07 »
I agree with what you say here.  Our regular size caches are usually tobacco containers or ammo cans.  The former usually works well but once in a while, the contents can get damp, which I assume may be from cachers not tightening the lid.

We did a little maintenance hike the other day and checked on a cache we had placed in May 2004. It is in a peanut butter jar and everything is in perfect shape and it still has the original dry log book

narcissa

  • Guest
Re: Geocache Containers - Protect your Investment
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2011, 08:40:50 »
I was astonished at the containers they got away with in Arizona. Real Tupperware, an old briefcase, metal tins! Here, though, the seasons present a real challenge to cache maintenance. Thanks for the tips!

royfran

  • Full Time Cacher
  • ***
  • Posts: 163
Re: Geocache Containers - Protect your Investment
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2011, 20:58:51 »
Another good lesson learned this morning.  I paid a visit to a cache I placed earlier this week with the intent of "tweaking" it, but to my complete surprize I found it entirely submerged.  I did not expect water to accumulate there but it did.  The camouflage tape (the hockey camo tape sold by Canadian Tire) looked like it had been battered by the elements for years but to my complete amazement there was not one drop of water inside the film cartridge (the white ones recommended for use by Groundspeak).  I had to redo the camouflage job using plastic camo tape; I don't recommend the hockey variety if the cache is expected to spend some time submerged or encased in ice.

GreyingJay

  • Guest
Re: Geocache Containers - Protect your Investment
« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2011, 11:10:05 »
I found a geocache called TREEHOLE http://coord.info/GCWHDJ in 2006 that was in a paperboard box lying on the ground under a large leaf. Needless to say it didn't last very long.

I remember searching for that one!  It was a poop-infested park and the coordinates were right behind someone's backyard.  Needless to say I didn't find the cache and after my DNF log, the cache was quickly archived by a reviewer.

bluelamb03

  • Administrator
  • Big Time Cacher
  • *****
  • Posts: 1637
  • Good hunting everyone!
Re: Geocache Containers - Protect your Investment
« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2011, 12:44:32 »
There's always new ideas out there, but if they're not tested the result may be an embarrassing fail.

A very popular container in G.E.O., though I've seen a few here in Ottawa, is the  micro centrifuge tube:



The snap lid isn't very water tight to start with and is often not closed properly. The result is that the log, already difficult to remove, is a sodden mass that falls to pieces as you try to dig it out of the tube.

On the other hand pop bottle preforms:



Seem to be fairly water tight in my experience, I've never found a wet one.

Blue -
« Last Edit: June 02, 2013, 14:43:51 by bluelamb03 »
Without shared stories we are strangers.
- Sheila Mendonça


Angutas Rest

  • Guest
Re: Geocache Containers - Protect your Investment
« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2011, 22:58:27 »
I like these cell phone containers from Walmart. Cost $5.00

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150386480948876&l=97450d7968

The plastic holds onto duct tape, and primer.

bluelamb03

  • Administrator
  • Big Time Cacher
  • *****
  • Posts: 1637
  • Good hunting everyone!
Re: Geocache Containers - Protect your Investment
« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2012, 14:46:24 »
I found an excellent example of how critters can deal with geocache containers, and why you never put food or scented items in a cache!
Have a look at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ftSkVK8NGOE&feature=youtu.be to see a very determined squirrel.
A raccoon would have it open in half the time, and a bear wouldn't even notice the tupperware.

Blue -
Without shared stories we are strangers.
- Sheila Mendonça


BlackRose67

  • Big Time Cacher
  • *****
  • Posts: 589
Re: Geocache Containers - Protect your Investment
« Reply #8 on: October 03, 2012, 15:14:54 »
There's always new ideas out there, but if they're not tested the result may be an embarrassing fail.
With my wife being a diabetic, we end up putting a lot of Glucerna bottles in the blue bin for recycling.

I was thinking these would make good cache containers that would fit the "small" cache size.
I figured since these bottles were designed to keep liquid inside, that they would also keep liquid out - they don't.

I cleaned one out and let it dry completely.
A couple of days later I performed a test on the bottle by putting some toilet paper in the bottle, put the cap on tight, and then placed it under a slow running tap for about 15 minutes.
I was surprised to see that water had managed to get inside the bottle through the cap.

royfran

  • Full Time Cacher
  • ***
  • Posts: 163
Re: Geocache Containers - Protect your Investment
« Reply #9 on: October 03, 2012, 17:18:31 »
They also have one other characteristic I've come to hate about certain cache containers: the opening is smaller than the container.

elyob

  • Full Time Cacher
  • ***
  • Posts: 208
Re: Geocache Containers - Protect your Investment
« Reply #10 on: October 04, 2012, 13:07:07 »
[A] characteristic I've come to hate about certain cache containers: the opening is smaller than the container.

I AGREE!!!

Frogging101

  • Guest
Re: Geocache Containers - Protect your Investment
« Reply #11 on: October 04, 2012, 13:10:53 »
They also have one other characteristic I've come to hate about certain cache containers: the opening is smaller than the container.


Why do you hate it? Is it because it makes it hard to trade swag items? That would be why I don't like it.

bluelamb03

  • Administrator
  • Big Time Cacher
  • *****
  • Posts: 1637
  • Good hunting everyone!
Re: Geocache Containers - Protect your Investment
« Reply #12 on: October 04, 2012, 13:18:31 »
It makes it very difficult to remove the logbook.

Blue -
Without shared stories we are strangers.
- Sheila Mendonça


Frogging101

  • Guest
Re: Geocache Containers - Protect your Investment
« Reply #13 on: October 04, 2012, 13:20:33 »
It makes it very difficult to remove the logbook.

Blue -

Oh of course... That too! I've had a few caches like that. Also some of the really tiny micros that I've seen (nanos? They're tiny and shiny and green) have the logbook rolled up so tight just to fit it in there that it's really hard to put back.

royfran

  • Full Time Cacher
  • ***
  • Posts: 163
Re: Geocache Containers - Protect your Investment
« Reply #14 on: October 04, 2012, 21:18:38 »
Also some of the really tiny micros that I've seen (nanos? They're tiny and shiny and green) have the logbook rolled up so tight just to fit it in there that it's really hard to put back.
I think you mean the bison tubes; nanos are even smaller than that, about the size of a fat blueberry.  If you think you hate rolling and putting back a tight-fitting log now, wait 'till you have to do it when it's -20 outside with a nice wind-chill factor...